Christmas Holidays Around the World (Celebration & Traditions)


Despite its historically religious roots, Christmas is now celebrated by a wider range of people than ever before. The customs and traditions associated with Christmas have also been subject to significant evolution and have been shaped by the communities in which Christmas is celebrated. These changes have occurred as a direct result of the communities. This is most likely the reason why the traditional Christmas ceremonies are just as varied and diverse as the many civilizations found all over the globe.

The United States of America is a prime example of a country in which several Christmas customs have been adopted from other nations. Immigrants, mostly those who came from Europe, are primarily responsible for bringing with them various traditions, which together form a diverse assortment. Germany is credited with being the birthplace of the Christmas tree, whereas England is credited with being the birthplace of the Yule log. Noels, which are now better known as carols, are a part of the customs of France, while Santa Claus is derived from the Dutch. Newly introduced traditional practises, such as the Mexican luminaries and the salutation “Feliz Navidad! “originating from Latin America” have been seen coexisting alongside freshly arrived immigrants in the United States.

Let’s conduct a quick assessment of some Christmas customs from across the world that are unique and entertaining in equal measure.

Africa 

Children run through the streets of Ghana on the Eve of Christmas, mouthing songs about Christ and crying, “Christ is coming! He is near!” People attend Church on Christmas eve or on Christmas day, and the service takes place on occasions. “Fufu,” a traditional dish consisting of yam and pasted rice, is served with okra soup, or stew, meat, and porridge to kin and intimates after the service.

Liberians hang bells from oil palms to decorate Christmas trees. Soap, sweets, books, pencils, cotton garments and other such simple articles are distributed as presents among family members, close friends, and other such individuals on Christmas. You may easily stumble upon a dramatisation of the events that took place on Christmas First, included in the curriculum of services by the Church on Christmas mornings.

Asia

Despite the fact that the majority of Asians are not Christian, the upper and middle classes of Asian society seem to have adopted many of the secular Western rituals of Christmas. This is despite the fact that Christians make up a minority in this region. Christmas trees, lights, and even the ubiquitous Santa Claus often make appearances at major departing airports.

Community rules and regulations sometimes allow Asians to lawfully attend Church gatherings in celebration of Christ’s birth on the night before Christmas as well as on Christmas itself. In China, where Christmas is celebrated as the Holy Birth Festival, many conventional Chinese symbols are used such as lanterns and flowers. Additionally, because the colour “red” happens to officially denote happiness in China, red paper chains are used as ornaments for Christmas trees, which are called “Chinese Christmas trees.”

Europe

Many of the Christmas rites that are practised in the United States were brought over from England. These customs include the Yule log, carolers, stories (including Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol), and stockings hung by the chimney. Carols, such as “Deck the Hall” and “Hark! The Herald Angel Sings,” wassails, and even roasted chestnuts are also a part of this tradition.

The Queen sends her warmest wishes to the people of England via television and radio broadcasts on Christmas Day. A Christmas dinner without Yorkshire puddings, roasted goose with currants, and Christmas cake would be quite unthinkable. Of course, it would also be unwise to forget to mention turkey stuffed with chestnut. Boxing Day, which allows everyone to give gifts to tradesmen and other such as mail carriers, is celebrated on the day after Christmas in the United States.

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